David makes 3D printing more versatile by using a variety of materials.

Photo Credit: Kickstarter and Sculptify   David is about to change the 3D printing game. The desktop printer uses a myriad of pelletized materials to create and build personalized designs.  The company behind David, Sculptify, has created their own 3D printing technology to utilize a variety of materials. They call it FLEX, or Fused Layer Extrusion. It allows them to use an expanded selection of materials, which increases the quality of materials and reduces the cost of material.  The printer uses what the company describes as raw pellets, which are basically readily available materials like plastic bags. This means you no longer need to purchase expensive pellets that are in limited sizes and colors, but you can personalize your pellets depending on the object you are printing.  So far, Sculptify has tested out materials like thermoplastic polyurethane, ethylene vinyl acetate, polylactide, and even wood.  The company estimates that the total cost of ownership for David, with 16 refills of pellets for an estimated use of two years, is $3,483, which is lower in comparison to other 3D printers. Sculptify is currently running a Kickstarter campaign to raise $100,000 in funding to go toward the development of new pellets and put David into mass production. At the time of writing this, they had reached more than $69,000. The campaign runs until September 18. See how David works in the video below. 

Photo Credit: Kickstarter and Sculptify

 

David is about to change the 3D printing game. The desktop printer uses a myriad of pelletized materials to create and build personalized designs. 

The company behind David, Sculptify, has created their own 3D printing technology to utilize a variety of materials. They call it FLEX, or Fused Layer Extrusion. It allows them to use an expanded selection of materials, which increases the quality of materials and reduces the cost of material. 

The printer uses what the company describes as raw pellets, which are basically readily available materials like plastic bags. This means you no longer need to purchase expensive pellets that are in limited sizes and colors, but you can personalize your pellets depending on the object you are printing. 

So far, Sculptify has tested out materials like thermoplastic polyurethane, ethylene vinyl acetate, polylactide, and even wood. 

The company estimates that the total cost of ownership for David, with 16 refills of pellets for an estimated use of two years, is $3,483, which is lower in comparison to other 3D printers.

Sculptify is currently running a Kickstarter campaign to raise $100,000 in funding to go toward the development of new pellets and put David into mass production. At the time of writing this, they had reached more than $69,000. The campaign runs until September 18.

See how David works in the video below.